Antonio Pipkin RAS

Antonoi Pipkin.PNG

Antonio Pipkin is a QB from Tiffin who declared with the 2017 draft class. His Relative Athletic Score (RAS) of 8.77 ranks 50 out of 399 qualifying QB.

His composite size score of 3.95 includes his height, weight, and if available his arm length and hand size and is below average for his position. His height of 6007 is considered far below average for a QB, having a relative score of 1.33. His weight of 225 is considered above average for a QB, having a relative score of 6.57.

His composite speed score of 8.73 includes his forty yard dash time, twenty yard split, and ten yard split with him grading above average for his position. A measurement of speed, the 40 yard dash is a measurement of the player’s vertical speed and acceleration. The 20 yard split is mainly looking to see if a player can sustain the quickness and burst gained from their first ten yards, which is measured in the 10 yard split. His 40 yard dash of 4.66 is considered elite and far above average for a QB, having a relative score of 8.61. His twenty yard split of 2.7 is considered far above average for a QB, having a relative score of 8.89. Finally, his ten yard split of 1.62 is considered far above average for a QB, having a relative score of 8.68. He reached a calculated top speed of 20.87 miles per hour during his 40 yard dash.

His composite explosiveness score of 8.86 includes his vertical leap and broad jump, measuring in above average for his position. The vert and broad measure lower body explosiveness and balance. Depending on position, these drills tend to be more of a threshold that players must meet rather than a clear measurement of exceptional ability. Often that means it’s more about not scoring poorly than it is about scoring very well. For some, however, these drills represent the best gauge of whether a player can explode out of their stance, attack the ball in the air, or gain a quick leverage advantage on their opponents.His vertical leap of 36.5 inches is considered elite and far above average for a QB, having a relative score of 9.47. His broad jump of 908 is considered far above average for a QB, having a relative score of 8.24.

His composite agility score of 6.97 includes his 5-10-5 short shuttle and L-3-Cone drills, measuring in above average for his position. This score is a combined metric meant to reflect the overall agility, flexibility, and change of direction skills of the player. Depending on position, many believe either or both of these drills are the most important of all measurements as it shows a player’s ability to move in space as well as burst and bend. His short shuttle time of 4.25 seconds is considered above average for a QB, having a relative score of 7.34. His 3 Cone time of 7.07 seconds is considered above average for a QB, having a relative score of 6.59.

Antonoi Pipkin2

2 thoughts on “Antonio Pipkin RAS

  1. You really need to either give up on the RAS or totally redo your system. You don’t attend any workouts, pro days, or combines and think you can determine their athleticism based on combine numbers? Most of the information your using has either nothing to do or a little to do with a players athleticism. There are lots of athletic players who ran mediocre times in the 40-yard dash or three cone etc. If you ran personal tests on players and did different drills or monitored their movement with computers then you may have a feasible system. The one in place now has no value in determinng athleticism. I don’t know what college you attended or what type of mathematics you studied, but is ridiculous to think you can educationally determine a person athleticism by these few basic tests.

    Like

    1. Thank you for your interest, Matt.

      I have attended pro days, in fact, and I’m curious as to why you would say that I have not, considering we have not met or spoken. But that’s neither here nor there.

      As far as determining athleticism based on combine numbers, this isn’t something that I’m suddenly deciding to do on a whim. It’s something the NFL has been doing for decades. As far as having little to do with athleticism, that’s patently false and I think you really know that. If it had nothing to do with anything, the NFL would not continue to do these tests every year, nor would they store and compile the data over at least three decades.

      You are correct that there are a lot of players who ran mediocre times, in fact I can point you to a number of them having spent the time to actually do the work and compile the data. They are, however, a rarity when compared to those players who have run such drills and done far better, in terms of those who have found actual NFL success. It’s very easy to simply say that these numbers do not matter, but anyone who actually takes the time to do the work can tell you that it matters fairly quickly.

      As far as running personal tests on the players and ‘monitoring their movement with computers,” while a good idea in a fantasy world where we can make such demands and have infinite resources, it defies the very definition of the word feasible.

      I would ask what college you attended and what types of mathematics you studied as well. You seem to have an open critique of my system and I’d be open to hearing why you think it is invalid from a mathematical standpoint.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s